17 March 2014 @ 02:43 pm
PETITION TO LEGALLY RECOGNIZE NONBINARY GENDERS IN THE UNITED STATES

This petition only has 36,000 signatures. It need 100,000 by March 21 for the US government to even look at it.
Please, we don't have much time. If you guys could sign it share with people you know, it would be greatly appreciated and could make a huge difference.

https://petitions.whitehouse.gov/petition/legally-recognize-non-binary-genders/rD3frkgr
 
 
 
22 December 2013 @ 01:46 am
This is game-related but also feminist-related so I hope personal reviews are okay. I linked it to my blog for length and because I'm lazy and already had this copy-pasta'd. I finished my finals last week and, to my disappointment, completed Far Cry 3.

THE GOOD
- I got this game for $5. Wish I got it for free.
- Ubisoft never disappoints when it comes to scenery, nature, and the animal animations and clippings.
- Gameplay mechanics are wonderful; very much like Assassin's Creed in FPS style. You've got the synchronizing in high places to map out locations, gain more ways to kill/stealth as you progress, do sidequests that don't have anything to do with the main mission, etc.

THE "F**K NO STOP THIS NOW" (TRIGGER WARNING: racism, sexism, rape; CONTAINS SPOILERS)

It's a long list of bad with a bit of profanity so prepare yourselves. If you found this helpful, please rate up on Steam so that it stays visible as it's the only honest review. Lots of Far Cry 3 stans so I'd been garnering quite a bit of hate but I expected it so any support is welcome.
 
 
A shout out to all the old-timers, who were here back when shit got really real at least once or twice a week. Maybe I'm wrong, but I think a major contributing factor to the decline of this community was "calling out fatigue" and a lot of extreme nastiness.

Not exactly a problem here these days, but here's a post at Black Girl Dangerous that addresses how to deal with making mistakes in social justice communities and touches on a lot stuff that went down here several years ago.

Hopefully this will be helpful for people working on social justice issues irl; I'm not sure exactly how to apply this to an online community where there's less trust and people don't necessary know who is a committed ally who f***** up and who is a troll.





I started having conversations on this practice of “calling in” after attending Race Forward’s Facing Race Conference in Baltimore, MD in 2012. Facing Race was a gathering of thousands of people working on advancing racial justice. The space was full of energy, commitment, and a ride-or-die-and-put-it-all-on-the-line mentality for making sure we’ve got our bases covered in this fight against racism and dismantling white supremacy.

What happens when thousands of people who all “get it” come together and everyone knows something about “the work”? We lose all compassion for each other. All of it.

...

I’ll be the first person and the last person to say that anger is valid. Mistakes are mistakes; they deepen the wounds we carry. I know that for me when these mistakes are committed by people who I am in community with, it hurts even more. But these are people I care deeply about and want to see on the other side of the hurt, pain, and trauma: I am willing to offer compassion and patience as a way to build the road we are taking but have never seen before.

...

We have been configured to believe it’s normal to punish each other and ourselves without a way to reconcile hurt. We support this belief by shutting each other out, partly through justified anger and often because some parts of us believe that we can do this without people who fuck up.

But, holy shit! We fuck up. All of us. I’ve called out and been called out plenty of times. I have gotten on people ruthlessly for supporting and sustaining oppression and refusing to listen to me. People have gotten on me about speaking to oppressions that aren’t mine, being superficial about inclusion, and throwing in communities I’m not a part of as buzzwords. But when we shut each other out we make clubs of people who are right and clubs of people who are wrong as if we are not more complex than that, as if we are all-knowing, as if we are perfect. But in reality, we are just really scared. Scared that we will be next to make a mistake. So we resort to pushing people out to distract ourselves from the inevitability that we will cause someone hurt.

And it is seriously draining. It is seriously heartbreaking. How we are treating each other is preventing us from actually creating what we need for ourselves. We are destroying each other. We need to do better for each other.

We have to let go of treating each other like not knowing, making mistakes, and saying the wrong thing make it impossible for us to ever do the right things.
 
 

K-pop Miss A group members

I’m not fat -- by American standards. I am considered slightly chubby for an Asian in China. I'm 5’1” and about 100 pounds, give or take five pounds depending on whether it’s New York Fashion Week or final exams week at Columbia. Everyone assumes I’m naturally petite because of my Asian genetics, but the truth is, I count my calories like Ebenezer Scrooge counts his gold coins and run and do yoga like Lululemon is paying me. The moment I “let myself go,” the weight bounces back.

I try not to talk about it, though, because the moment I do, someone always says, “Shut up, you’re Asian. You have genetics on your side.”

That's the problem -- Asian girls are suffering from body image issues and eating disorders because they try to hold themselves up to the expectation that Asian girls are naturally slim. In fact, in an interview with The Wall Street Journal, Diane von Furstenberg said, “It is great to design for Chinese women, because they have great bodies. They are slim and have tiny waists, so it's nice.”

Elizabeth Harker recently wrote the most amazing piece about being a fat foreign girl in China, in which she discovered the difference between pang, which means fat in an almost affectionate way, and fei, which is the adjective my mother uses to describe fatty pork dishes. Asians are open to talking about weight -- they’ll force-feed you when they think you’re too thin and they’ll shame you when they think you’re too fat.

More insight...Collapse )

Source
 
 
CW: Racism, Sexism / Misogyny, Objectification, Body Shaming / Cosmetic Surgery / ED

(Original post from Althouse)

I don't care about this kind of music and dance, and I've never paid any attention to this lady who — I see — went away and has come back, but I've been interested in the ins and outs of the discourse of feminism since before Ms. was a magazine. And I've been observing American racial politics at least since I was 10 years old, when Life magazine featured photographs like these. Everyone read Life, but not every 10 year old had, set out next to Life on the family coffee table, the latest issue of Playboy.

So indulge me while I take a look at the race trouble that's befallen Ms. Allen and inquire into soundness of her "I'm protesting the objectification of women" story. Here's the video that went up 2 days ago and has over 2 million views.

Full article behind the cutCollapse )

Source

Additional articles:
Lily Allen's Anti Black Feminism - Vice
"From Lorde to Macklemore, it’s a sentiment that’s galling for its popularity: white artists need to stop using the wealth signifiers of rap music to gesture at their self-important “anti-consumerism.” What Allen misses as she washes rims in a kitchen decorated only with bottles of champagne is that it’s not anti-consumerism when it only targets one type of consumer."

Is There a Racist Undertone to Lily Allen’s “Hard Out Here” Video? - Flavorwire
"But beyond the mocking frame, if you think about the result for the women who are actually dancing in the video, it is still the same as your average Miley Cyrus/Gwen Stefani/Madonna exploitation of women of color. Let’s get abstract for a second: Here’s a white lady, singing about how she resents having to lose weight and generally be treated as a sex object. And she’s dancing with a number of comparatively voiceless and nameless black women. Their feelings about the situation they find themselves in are neither highlighted nor even explored; most of the time they’re smiling and laughing, as though they were enjoying themselves in the act. And let’s face it: most people are going to walk away from this video thinking, “Oh, those dancers were having fun,” and leave it there. For most people, there’s nothing wrong with a nameless, voiceless black women dancing in the background."

Lily Allen Hits Back at 'Hard Out Here' Racism Claims - Spin
"The video is meant to be a lighthearted satirical video that deals with objectification of women within modern pop culture," she wrote. "It has nothing to do with race, at all." She explained that despite two weeks of rehearsing her own twerk, she was unable to master the move, and added that the reason she was wearing more clothes than her dancers was her own insecurity."

Lily Allen's video for 'Hard Out Here' is a bit racist, but not to her - News.com

ETA

Per parlance's suggestion, Easy Out There For A (White) Bitch: A Few Words On Lily Allen and the Continued Use of Black Women’s Bodies As Props - Black Girl Dangerous

"I like satire as much as the next person. I write a lot of satirical stuff myself. And you know what? Satire works best when you are flipping the script on the oppressor, on the system. When you are calling attention to the ways that the system is jacked by amplifying the absurdity of that system. Not caricaturing and otherwise disrespecting the people who are oppressed by that system."
 
 


Katy Perry released the first single from her upcoming album last week and already it’s become a worldwide hit. While some people might find the song self-empowering and inspirational, by taking a closer look at the lyrics, it appears to be an anthem for victim-blaming.

The first verse of the song shows the singer in what would presumably be an abusive relationship. “I used to bite my tongue and hold my breath, scared to rock the boat and make a mess. So I sat quietly, agreed politely.” Here she is displaying the number one classic symptom of being a victim of domestic abuse: fear of upsetting one’s partner for fear of repercussions.

She begins to show signs of victim-blaming with the lyrics “You held me down, but I got up. Already brushing off the dust. Get ready cause I’ve had enough.” Domestic abuse is incredibly difficult for victims to overcome. Most of domestic abuse is psychological and that’s what makes it so hard for victims to break free from, even with a support system in place. For Katy Perry to simply “brush off” her abuser and leave the abusive relationship is insulting to victims of domestic abuse and puts the responsibility and blame on them.

In the second verse she sings “stinging like a bee, I earned my stripes” Do victims of domestic abuse who leave with the help and support of others not earn their stripes? Must you leave on your own to earn these stripes? She continues with the most insulting line of the song “I went from zero to my own hero” stating that she was a “zero” before because she was a victim of domestic abuse. Nobody who is in an abusive relationship is a “zero”. It’s this kind of self-blame that keeps so many victims suffering alone in the dark.

While people everywhere sing along to the song on the radio feeling empowered, they are contributing to a victim-blaming culture that keeps domestic abuse victims silent. Now that’s something to “roar” about.

source
 
 
'I'm a breathtakingly cocky fraud': Married male feminist and college professor admits he has no qualifications to teach women's studies and had affairs with a 23-year-old and a porn star during twitter meltdown.
- California professor Hugo Schwyzer tweeted almost non-stop for an hour, admitting to being a fraud and a hypocrite.
- Schwyzer made a career teaching feminism but said he has no academic qualifications in the area.
- He admitted to sexting a porn star and cheating on his wife with a 23-year-old.
- Schwyzer said he suffers from bipolar disorder and borderline personality disorder.
- The professor said he will only teach English medieval history from now on, because he is a 'pisspoor' feminist.


Read moreCollapse )

Source/tweets/pics

I started having questions and doubts about him after I'd heard about what he did in his past so I stopped taking his classes but after this, I'm just really shocked. His content is good but him...not so much. Just really appalled right now. I feel like he might be using mental illness to sort of excuse his behavior but then again, considering the fame and celebrity he received, maybe not.
 
 
14 August 2013 @ 12:19 am
In The Smurfs 2, men are identified by their abilities, while women are known for their femininity.



In The Smurfs 2, there are a lot of Smurfs. And they all have names based on their unique qualities. According to the cast list, the male ones are Papa, Grouchy, Clumsy, Vanity, Narrator, Brainy, Handy, Gutsy, Hefty, Panicky, Farmer, Greedy, Party Planner, Jokey, Smooth, Baker, Passive-Aggressive, Clueless, Social, and Crazy. And the female one is Smurfette--because being female is enough for her. There is no boy Smurf whose identifying quality is his gender, of course, because that would seem hopelessly limited and boring as a character.

These characters, originating as they did in mid-century Europe, exhibit the quaint sexism in which boys or men are generic people--with their unique qualities and abilities--while girls and women are primarily identified by their femininity. The Smurfs 2, which premiered last weekend and came in third at the box office, doesn't upend the premise of Smurfette.

Here are the Smurf characters McDonald's is using for their Happy Meals:



When you buy a Happy Meal at McDonald's, the cashier asks if it's for a boy or a girl. In my experience, which is admittedly limited to my daughters, girls get Smurfette. I guess boys get any of the others.

Continued on The Atlantic
 
 
07 August 2013 @ 09:23 am
Sheilah O’Donnel tells herself that her new home, a townhouse in a development in Chevy Chase, Md., just a stone’s throw from a Safeway, isn’t really all that bad. Sure, it’s near a gas station. And the front window, with its cheerily upholstered cushions, overlooks a dreary parking lot. And yes, it’s kind of small — “an apartment,” O’Donnel, who is 44, sometimes says bitterly, when she’s reminded of her former life with her ex-husband in their custom-built, six-bedroom home. But then again, it’s perfectly maintained and impeccably furnished, and most important, it’s rented with her own money, from the first real job she has had in almost a decade.

It’s a midlevel sales job, a big step down from the senior position she held before she had children and quit work. When she was first hired, in May 2011, her salary was just a fifth of what she earned at her peak. But, she said, she wasn’t complaining. All around her, she saw women her age scrambling to find work, some divorcing and losing their homes. She liked to help them, editing their résumés, polishing cover letters, pumping up tearful friends who forgot what they were worth after years without a paycheck.

After one emotional session with a friend, her 12-year-old daughter asked what all the fuss was about. O’Donnel told her: “This is the perfect reason why you need to work. You don’t have to make a million dollars. You don’t have to have a wealthy lifestyle. You just always have to be able to at least earn enough so you can support yourself.”

Nine years ago, O'Donnel was promoting a very different message.Collapse )

Source

Long, but I found this interesting to read.